Horse and Thinker lying down

 

Alternative position

The Horse and Thinker exercise performed in sitting can be done lying down on the bed.  Some people are unable to do this exercise in sitting so doing it lying down is a good alternative.  This exercise is intended to treat the side of the pubic bone when the pubic bone is out of alignment.  I have patients who have found this exercise to be successful in reducing pain throughout the body.  

 

One patient’s migraine headache went away and has not returned in 10 years using this simple stretch for 90 seconds.   I continue to be amazed to see the changes people find after doing this exercise.  I recall one day when I saw 8 patients and 5 of them had their pain reduce with this one exercise.  What was so interesting was that different complaints resolved with the same stretch.  Pain resolved included:  knee, shoulder, back, neck, and hip.  Hopefully, you will be able to see a change after doing this Releasing Joint Restriction (RJR) movement combination.

 

Pre-test and Post-test

Remember to find a pre-test or some movement or position that feels uncomfortable or causes pain.  Then do the lying down exercise for the side of the pubic bone for 90 seconds.  After this. repeat the movement or position that was uncomfortable which is the post-test.  Did anything change? Repeat the Releasing Joint Restriction exercise to the other leg for 90 seconds.   Sometimes things may be worse.  

 

If you do feel better after doing it to one side and then worse after doing the other side.  Repeat the first position that made you feel better.  Next time you do it try doing the one that makes you feel worse first.  Then finish with the one that makes you feel the best.  I think of feeling worse as a sign that things can be changed.  So in a strange way, it is a positive finding.

Releasing Joint Restrictions

Another thing that may happen is that pain in the body that you were noticing before doing the stretch is better but somewhere else may feel worse.  I believe this is a sign that the joint you just worked on is now in better alignment so the next joint that is held restricted is now screaming for attention.  I will continue to give you tools to unlock other joints as I write more posts.  

Using Releasing Joint Restrictions (RJR) or Strain and Counter Strain (SCS) can be very helpful but it can also feel overwhelming because there are so many joints in the body that can be restricted from moving normally.  The good news is that many people with pain all over can often reduce their pain with 5-6 stretching positions.  I will keep adding the different positions or movement combinations.

Movement Combination

The movement combination which I call the Horse and Thinker in sitting is actually used to treat the side of the pubic bone.  In lying down this exercise might be easier.  First slide the foot out to the side as far as is comfortable, then bend the knee, and finally drop the bent knee in toward the opposite leg.  Perform this stretching exercise for 90 seconds.  Then repeat your post-test to see if anything changed.

R side pubic bone lying down

Now do it to the other side, sliding foot out to the side, then bend the knee and finally drop the bent knee in toward the opposite leg.  Stay in this position for 90 seconds and finish with a post-test to see if anything changed.

L side pubic bone lying down

 

No Overuse

Since this exercise is a passive stretch, meaning you are staying relaxed in the position and not firing or contracting any muscles, you cannot overuse the muscles.  Therefore, it is OK to do this as frequently as you like.  I recommend doing it at least two times a day and again anytime the pain increases.

 

Handout: 

 

You may find more benefit from the horse and thinker position either in sitting or lying down.  You decide if one is more beneficial or easier to work it into your life.  I hope you will use it as often as it makes you feel comfortable.   

 

Click here to see previous information on horse and thinker in sitting.  

 

Contact:  Loraine@doctorlovejoyevans.com

 

© Dr. Loraine Lovejoy-Evans, DPT